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October 2018 Archives

Halloween period brings amped-up police presence on Colorado roads

Varied meteorology reports for this week converge closely in their view that Denver and surrounding environs will be A-OK for trick-or-treaters on Halloween this Wednesday. Weather pundits are calling for highs in the 50s and clear skies. That should be a prime catalyst to help ensure big candy hauls for the youngsters.

Federal sentencing spotlight: reform on horizon in some drug cases?

We duly note on a page of our website at the tenured Denver criminal defense law firm of Shazam Kianpour & Associates that the federal legal system involves an “ever-present risk.”

Even first-time DUI offenders can get jail time

In Colorado, the punishment for driving under the influence (DUI) can be quite severe, even if it is your first offense. In fact, DUI penalties for first-time offenders may include a fine, license revocation, community service, probation and the possible installation of an ignition interlock device on your car.

Spotlight on impaired driving in Colorado enforcement campaign

Colorado is at the vanguard of American states that have liberalized marijuana laws. The allowance given state residents to use pot for recreational and medicinal purposes means that consumers can drive under the influence, correct?

Many offenses are erased from juvenile records in Colorado

Nearly everyone knows that having a criminal record can create a wide variety of future challenges. Not only must these individuals live with the stigma of their past convictions, but their records can make it more difficult to find a job, obtain a loan or even sign a lease for a place to live.

Should criminal history be queried on college applications?

We noted in a recent blog post a particularly disturbing reality for some young people in Colorado and elsewhere connected with the rite of college admission. Our September 24 entry zeroed in on the moment when a hopeful applicant confronts “an application question soliciting details regarding a past arrest or conviction.”