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Shazam Kianpour & Associates, P.C.
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Covid-19 Statement

PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options.

Shazam Kianpour & Associates, P.C.
A Proven Criminal Defense Team

Are you tempted to share your prescription drugs?

by | Aug 11, 2021 | Drug Charges |

Prescriptions drugs are part of life for a large segment of society. These drugs can improve the user’s quality of life, help battle an illness or medicinally serve the user in some specific way. Because they can be so beneficial, some may want to share their medication with family or friends with a similar ailment. However, the script is specifically written for the individual and is only valid when used by them. Excepting those picking up medication at the pharmacy for a friend or family member, any person caught using or transporting prescription drugs will likely face serious legal jeopardy. Moreover, whoever receives and uses the prescription drugs you gave them also breaks the law.

Penalties are at the state and federal level

Under Colorado law, those convicted of sharing their medication will likely not get charged with a level 4 prescription fraud felony, which can result in a year in jail and up to $100,000 in fines. There may be aggravating factors, like a history of addiction or the drugs are highly addictive.

The so-called “wobbler offense” reduces the felony to a misdemeanor — these misdemeanor charges could still result in a year in jail and a $1,000 fine. They could even get reduced to a petty offense or civil infraction if the circumstances merit it.

It’s best to take these charges seriously

Fortunately, the laws have become a little bit more flexible from the old days of “zero tolerance.” Nonetheless, those facing charges should be mindful of the impact. It is generally best to fight these charges or reduce them to minimize the effect on the defendant’s present and future prospects. A knowledgeable defense attorney with experience handling drug charges can be a great asset in this.

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