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Covid-19 Statement

PLEASE NOTE: To protect your safety in response to the threats of COVID-19, we are offering our clients the ability to meet with us in person, via telephone or through video conferencing. Please call our office to discuss your options.

Shazam Kianpour & Associates, P.C.
A Proven Criminal Defense Team

You ran that red light. No, I didn’t.

On Behalf of | May 10, 2021 | Traffic Violations |

Ultimately, it seems as though a matter of behind-the-wheel contention is going to end up being decided in court. By all indications, there is absolutely zero chance that a Colorado Springs resident is going to pay a $120 traffic citation he recently received in the town of Woodland Park.

In fact, Jake Turnbull seems determined to expend nearly countless time and energy fighting an accusation that he decries as bogus.

“If this ticket was $1, I’d go to court,” he told a media outlet following an incident a few weeks back that he says was reminiscent of “the Twilight Zone.”

Did Turnbull run a red light in the town? A local resident says he did and reported him to the town’s police department. Turnbull adamantly begs to differ, contending that the light was yellow.

The twist in the case: Although other towns and municipalities in Colorado – including Denver – allow citizens to report alleged driving infractions, follow-up enforcement action first mandates some corroborative evidence.

The bottom line: Police officers will want to see proof of wrongdoing that is supported by something like a video or photo.

That requirement is nixed in Woodland Park, where a complaint can be filed based solely on a third party’s contention that another driver committed an infraction.

In Turnbull’s case, that is precisely what happened. And now, as noted in the above-cited article, the matter will revolve around “one man’s word against the other’s” in the upcoming court hearing.

Turnbull’s draw-the-line attitude concerning the matter is manifestly clear. He has taken to social media to tell his story, where he has received both widespread support and offers of financial support to contest the allegation.

Turnbull calls the allowance to report a motorist for an alleged infraction without supporting objective proof “dangerous.” He deems his situation “a case of you’re guilty until you’re proven innocent.”

We will update readers on the outcome of the case following the upcoming court decision.

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